"And so I think there's a little bit of negativity that's associated with sales tech. But what I always recommend to organizations is to bring sales advocates into the evaluation."

From Episode 9: Enabling the Thoroughly Modern Sales Professional with Outreach’s Mary Shea

Clip Transcript:

So how can sales professionals better utilize all this new technology once something is rolled out to them and we get past the push back, how can people embrace this technology, what would salespeople have to do?

Well, I think I think salespeople are more than willing to embrace technology or a new initiative. If, like you said, Tom, they understand what's in it for them and what's in it for their customers. Oftentimes, I think when I think about sales technology, I go back to CRM and I hope Benioff and all the others won't be upset with me if I say, you know, those rollouts were really bungled and they were bungled before you even purchased the tech.

They were, because sellers were not brought into the conversation. There were education sessions. You didn't understand the use cases and they didn't understand how it was going to make their world better. In the case of CRM, it probably wasn't making the world better. It was making their managers' world better, making forecasting easier, activity tracking better. And so I think there's a little bit of negativity that's associated with sales tech. But what I always recommend to organizations is to bring sales advocates into the evaluation.

If you're looking at a new technology provider or new technology tool and help them understand what's in it for them, but also learn from them around what their workflows look like, how they spend their time, what their activities are like, who they interact with internally and externally, so that, when you roll out this program and the technology, it relates to their world. And so I think the first step happens before you've even bought the thing.